Saturday, September 08, 2007

meltin' metal.




on this post we're getting things hot.....i use oxy-acetylene for everything i do...silver brazing and brass fillet brazing for frame joints. it is strong, much stronger then the tubing! the brass i use, high fluidity rod from henry james, has a high nickle content, and melts at around 1650*. the torch flame it's self burns at over 6000*!!. don't let that touch your skin! {i have.} the flame is green due to the gasfluxer adding flux into the aceteleyne line, which allows the brass to flow nicely. that, and alot of practice and skill! i have thousands of brazes under my belt by now. it's a tedious skill to pick up, i first learned it at united bicycle institute quite some time ago.....sorry i missed out on a seat stay post, sorta spaced that one...i'll do that one again soon. and, a finished braze. sweet!!! the white/clear material is flux. it helps the metal flow, shows you the temperature the metal is at, and cleans the metal. flux is your friend! next, the frame goes into a dunk tank where water dissolves the flux. next, alot of polishing! draftsman, engineer, machinist, brazier, jeweler. you gotta wear alot of hats at this job. thanks for reading, steve.

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

I really like the way your are documenting the build process. I'm picking up some details for future reference. Thanks.

framebuilder wantabe

Anonymous said...

Dude, if there is one thing evident in the documentation on your blog: It is, that you do what you love, and you love what you do.
Rock 'n' roll man.

-Al

Monoix said...

Hi! I hope you see this Steve, and have the time to answer!

How much of the joint can you braze in a sweep? I understand it's different on different places, but to build up the the fillet (?), can you only do that when the joint is fairly horizontal, and then you have to turn the frame?

And I guess the whole joint is fully brazed in the tubes contact area, the brass being sucked in by capillary forces, before you start building up the radius?

denise garro said...

I'll never forget how you struggled for less than an hour out in your shop after your accident too weak to sit much longer. thinking you may never be able to work again. how proud of you I am.....love you